Data loss and downtime: Indian biz lose $54 billion per year

Due to data loss and downtime, Indian businesses are losing more than $54 billion per year, said a survey of IT decision makers by EMC.

Businesses globally lost 400 percent more data on average over the last two years.

53 percent of global IT professionals are not fully confident in their ability to recover information following an incident. 70 percent of India organizations are still not fully confident in their ability to recover after a disruption.

Companies with three or more vendors lost 7.9 times as much data as those with a single-vendor strategy.

43 percent of organizations in India still lack a disaster recovery plan for emerging workloads. 9 percent have plans for big data, hybrid cloud and mobile.

4 percent of India organizations are data protection Leaders; 15 percent Adopters; 81 percent are behind the curve.

China, Hong Kong, The Netherlands, Singapore and the US lead protection maturity; Switzerland, Turkey and the UAE lag behind. India ranks 6th out of 24 countries surveyed.

EMC Global Data Protection Index surveyed 3,300 IT decision makers from mid-size to enterprise-class businesses across 24 countries, including 125 respondents from India.

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India

The average business experienced 23 hours of unexpected downtime in the last 12 months.

Other commercial consequences of disruptions were loss of employee productivity (58 percent), and loss of revenue (50 percent).

43 percent of businesses lack a disaster recovery plan for big data, mobile and hybrid cloud environments and just 9 percent have a plan for all three

64 percent rated big data, mobile and hybrid cloud as difficult to protect.

With 39 percent of all primary data located in some form of cloud storage, this could result in substantial loss.

Those using three or more vendors to supply data protection solutions lost 7.9 times as much data as those who unified their data protection strategy around a single vendor

Those with three vendors were also likely to spend an average of $3 million more on their data protection infrastructure compared to those with one.

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