AMD unveils ambidextrous computing roadmap harnessing x86 and ARM

AMD has unveiled a new ambidextrous computing roadmap that harnesses the characteristics of both the x86 and ARM ecosystems.

Unveiling the new device roadmap, the company announced its 64-bit ARM architecture license for the development of custom high-performance cores for high-growth markets.

This is the first time a major processor provider has created the IP path to allow others to leverage innovation across both ARM and x86 ecosystems, AMD said.

The announcement also provides a forward-looking glimpse into AMD’s development plans to deliver truly unmatched ambidextrous computing and graphics performance using a shared, flexible infrastructure to enable its customers to blaze new paths of innovation for the embedded, server and client markets as well as semi-custom solutions, the company added.

“Before today, AMD was the only company in the world to deliver high performance and low-power x86 with leadership graphics. AMD now takes a bold step forward and has become the only company that can provide high-performance 64-bit ARM and x86 CPU cores paired with world-class graphics,” said Rory Read, AMD president and CEO.

AMD’s ambidextrous design capability, combined with our portfolio of IP and expertise with high-performance SoCs, means that AMD is set to deliver ambidextrous solutions that enable our customers to change the world in more efficient and powerful ways, Read added.

The market for ARM- and x86-based processors is expected to grow to more than $85 billion by 2017.  AMD is trying to capture this market by delivering differentiated solutions capable of addressing the breadth of this market.

AMD’s ambidextrous computing roadmap includes “Project SkyBridge” – a new design framework, available starting in 2015, which will feature a new family of 20 nanometer APUs and SoCs that are expected to be the world’s first pin-compatible ARM and x86 processors.

Another one, “K12,” is a new high-performance, low-power ARM-based core that takes deep advantage of AMD’s ARM architectural license, extensive 64-bit design expertise, and a core development team led by Chief CPU Architect Jim Keller.

AMD also demonstrated for the first time its 64-bit ARM-based AMD Opteron A-Series processor, codenamed “Seattle,” running a Linux environment derived from the Fedora Project.

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