IBM assists Ghana, Kenya, Morocco to improve public health and workforce

Enterprise IT vendor IBM is assisting Ghana, Kenya and Morocco to improve public health and workforce development.

42 IBM specialists, part of IBM’s Corporate Service Corps, shared their strategies to solve issues in civic, social, education and business organizations. IBM wants these governments to utilize technologies to streamline and automate the operations of local and national agencies.

IBM in Ghana

IBM designed a model to enable Ghana officials to analyze data in the digital cloud to predict the results of healthcare policies and provide mechanisms for implementing policies. This will help Ghana allocate resources to reduce the mother-to-child HIV transmission rate to 5 percent by 2018, and to less than 1 percent by 2020.

The enterprise IT vendor is working with the Yale University and the ONE Campaign and designed a plan for managing an awareness and disease elimination campaign at the community, district and national levels.

This apart, IBM proposed a National eHealth System, where information would be stored, analyzed and accessed in a digital cloud and built on the IBM Mainframe, allowing for analysis and mobile access to insights.

IBM in Africa

IBM in Kenya

IBM trained 50 students and software developers in Kenya to enhance technical and entrepreneurial skills. Some sessions focused on topics such as cloud, big data analytics, Internet of Things, and mobile computing.

IBM in Morocco

The company worked with Ibn Rochd Hospital and suggested a business process management plan into its pharmacy operations to ensure that the right medicines are readily available to patients.

IBM also developed strategies for the Moroccan Association for the Fight against AIDS that called for a more centralized process of storing, sharing and quickly analyzing large amounts of data. In addition, IBM also suggested the integration of social media to enhance stakeholder engagement and education.

Pix: IBM

  • Kobby Blay

    We are grateful and expect more and extended work with private groups and individuals in the digital health terrain in Ghana..